Only Elite Supplements for Elite Athletes

Elitepro™
Elitepro™
Elitepro™

Elitepro™

Anabolic Mineral Support
30 Day Supply (120 Tablets)
Regular price $25.99
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ElitePro™ minerals fill your nutritional gaps. Our minerals are fully chelated, ensuring hardcore athletes have the energy systems, protein synthesis, hormone production, bone density, insulin sensitivity, and blood-sugar management required for elite-level performance. The formula includes five key minerals – magnesium, zinc, selenium, chromium, and vanadium – assuring your mineral-supported biology is optimized and running at full speed.*

Fully Chelated for Best Absorption*

Elitepro™ Benefit

Supports Natural
Testosterone Production*

Elitepro™ Benefit

Optimizes Protein
Utilization*

Elitepro™ Benefit

Fortifies Health
& Key Minerals*

  • Supports natural testosterone production*
  • Replaces key mineral deficiencies caused from the most brutal training and competition*
  • Is fully chelated for maximum absorption*
  • Supports protein synthesis (a series of chemical reactions that form the basis of muscle building)*
  • Helps regulate blood sugar levels and insulin*

Athletes and lifters lose vital minerals through sweat and exercise, especially intense weight training. One intense workout can deplete magnesium levels for up to 18 days. Similar effects can occur with zinc and other crucial minerals.

ElitePro™ Minerals, as the name implies, is designed for elite and professional-level athletes. These athletes perform at the edge of genetic limitations, and their bodies require highly advanced mineral replenishment to function optimally.*

Organ and energy systems, immune function, and anabolic hormone levels depend upon maintaining optimal levels of certain minerals. ElitePro™ Minerals is the only formula in the world designed specifically to support these ideal levels.*

Chromium

Chromium is a trace mineral that helps you use carbohydrates for energy, improving athletic performance while slimming down your waistline.* Learn More

Magnesium

Magnesium plays a role in over 300 biochemical reactions and is crucial to energy production, protein synthesis, and insulin metabolism.* Learn More

Selenium

Selenium is a trace mineral famous for being a powerful antioxidant and its ability to increase the telomere length of human leukocytes, thereby making it a legitimate longevity supplement.* Learn More

Vanadium

Vanadium, a trace mineral, is a known "insulin mimetic," which means it copies some of the effects of insulin and aids in carbohydrate metabolism.* Learn More

Zinc

Zinc, an essential mineral, plays a pivotal role in producing and regulating several hormones, including testosterone, and it fortifies the immune system.* Learn More

SUPPLEMENT FACTS

Servings Size 4 Tablets
Servings Per Container 30

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value

Magnesium (as glycinate chelate) 400 mg 95%†

Zinc (as arginate chelate) 30 mg 273%†

Selenium (as glycinate complex) 200 mcg 364%†

Chromium (as nicotinate-glycinate chelate) 200 mcg 571%†

Vanadium (as nicotinate-glycinate chelate) 100 mcg

† Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
‡ Daily Value not established.

Other Ingredients: Microcrystalline cellulose, stearic acid, silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, croscarmellose sodium, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (for coating).

  • Take 4 tablets once per day at bedtime.

What happens if I'm mineral deficient?

In short, a deficiency in these five minerals can lead to suboptimal testosterone levels, disappointing results in training, fatigue, and difficulty losing body fat or staying lean.*

ElitePro™ minerals contain the highest quality, most easily absorbed forms of these minerals, ensuring that your body has what it needs for high-level performance.*

What makes ElitePro minerals "elite"?

NFL players are required to supplement with vitamins and minerals. Tim Ziegenfuss, a PhD in Exercise Science and Sports Nutrition, works with a lot of these players, providing them with dietary protocols. But a few years ago he had a problem. He knew that average store-bought mineral supplements weren't designed for the elite athlete's needs, and he knew that most of these formulations just didn't work well.

Dr. Ziegenfuss asked Biotest to come up with a designer formulation using only the highest quality minerals that the body can actually absorb and put to work.

Biotest utilized the ultimate mineral research group and manufacturer, Albion Labs, to make the world's best mineral supplement. Albion's patented technology produces totally reacted amino-acid chelates. This means that each mineral atom is double-bonded to an amino-acid molecule, thereby making an amino-acid chelate that's not only small enough to pass through the intestine, but small enough to be transported right into the cell itself.*

Mineral formulations that aren't chelated are problematic. At worst, they're not absorbed. At best, they're nominally utilized because the majority of the foods we eat have chemicals in them that inhibit their absorption. But because of the chelation process, it doesn't matter if you take ElitePro Minerals with food or without food. However, we recommend taking the formulation at night because magnesium has a mild sleep-inducing effect.

The ElitePro formula ensures that hardcore athletes have energy systems, protein synthesis, hormone production, bone density, and insulin and blood-sugar management required for elite-level performance. You can know for certain that all your mineral-supported biological functions are optimized and running at full speed.*

How do you know your minerals are fully chelated?

The amino-acid chelates used in ElitePro Minerals have been tested by the following methods:*

  • X-Ray Diffraction
  • Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectrometry
  • Infrared Spectrometry
  • Fourier-Transformed Infrared Spectrometry

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  19. ZMA

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  6. ZMA

  7. Brilla L et al. Effects of a Novel Zinc-Magnesium Formulation on Hormones and Strength. Journal of Exercise Physiology (online). 3(4): 26-36, 2000.
  8. Wilborn CD et al. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA) Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2004; 1(2): 12–20. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-1-2-12

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.