I-Well Immune Support
I-Well Immune Support
I-Well Immune Support

I-Well Immune Support

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There's great interest in safe and natural substances that strengthen the innate immune system. The term for this effect is "trained immunity." Biotest used trained immunity as its design goal when developing the I-Well™ formula by including four potent compounds proven to fortify immunity: beta-1,3-glucan, lipidized turmeric curcumin, EGCG, and microencapsulated Vitamin D3.*

For Trained Immunity*

  • Beta-1,3-glucan primes, strengthens, and maintains healthy immunity.
  • Solid lipid curcumin particles promote a healthy inflammatory response, neurological health, and cardiovascular health.
  • Vitamin D3 supplies a required micronutrient for optimal inflammatory response.
  • EGCG supports cellular, cardiovascular, brain, and metabolic health.

Fortifies Your Immune System*

I-Well Immune Support Benefit

Boosts & Strengthens
Healthy Immunity*

I-Well Immune Support Benefit

Supports Healthy
Inflammatory Response*

I-Well Immune Support Benefit

Supports Cellular,
Heart, & Brain Health*

  1. Moorlag S et al. β-Glucan Induces Protective Trained Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection: A Key Role for IL-1 Cell Reports 31, 107634, May 19, 2020. DOI: doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2020.107634.
  2. Del Cornò M et al. Shaping the Innate Immune Response by Dietary Glucans: Any Role in the Control of Cancer? Cancers 2020, 12, 15. DOI: 10.3390/cancers12010155.
  3. Borchani C et al. Structural Characterization, Technological Functionality, and Physiological Aspects of Fungal B-D-glucans: A Review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 56(10:1746-52, PMIC 25830657, Jul 2016.
  4. Vetvicka V et al. Glucans and Cancer: Comparison of Commercially Available B-glucans – Part IV. Anticancer Res, 38(3):1327-1333, Mar 2018.
  5. Davis JM et al. Effects of oat beta-glucan on innate immunity and infection after exercise stress. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004, Aug;36(8):1321-7.
  6. Volman JJ et al. Dietary modulation of immune function by β-glucans. Physiology & Behavior, Volume 94, Issue 2, 23 May 2008, Pages 276-284.
  7. Rondanelli M et al. The biological activity of beta-glucans. Minerva Med. 2009 Jun;100(3):237-45.
  8. Vetvicka V et al. β-Glucan Improves Conditions of Chronic Fatigue in Mice by Stimulation of Immunity. The Open Biochemistry Journal, 2-18-2020.
  9. Akramiene D et al. Effects of ß-glucans on the immune system. Medicinia, 11 August 2007.
  10. Graugaum HJ et al. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled nutritional study using an insoluble yeast beta-glucan to improve the immune defense system. Dood Nutr Sci, 3(6):738-746, June 2012.
  11. Carlos AF et al. β-Glucan successfully stimulated the immune system in different jawed vertebrate species. Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Volume 62, February 2019, Pages 1-6.
  12. Garcia-Valtanen p et al. Evaluation of trained immunity by β-1, 3 (D)-glucan on murine monocytes in vitro and duration of response in vivo. Immunology and Cell Biology (2017) 95, 601–610; DOI: 10.1038/icb.2017.13.
  13. Paris S et al. β-Glucan-Induced Trained Immunity in Dogs. Front. Immunol. 09 October 2020. 11:566893. DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2020.566893.
  14. Byrne K et al. Differential induction of innate memory in porcine monocytes by b-glucan or bacillus Calmette-Guerin. Innate Immunity. 0(0) 1–13. 2020. DOI: 10.1177/1753425920951607.
  15. Petit J et al. Long-lived effects of administering b-glucans: Indications for trained immunity in fish. Developmental and Comparative Immunology 64 (2016) 93e102. 2016. DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dci.2016.03.003.
  16. Kwanghook K et al. Algae-derived β-glucan enhanced gut health and immune responses of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic E. coli. Animal Feed Science and Technology, Volume 248, February 2019.
  17. Abraham A et al. A novel vaccine platform using glucan particles for induction of protective responses against Francisella tularensis and other pathogens. Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 198: 143–152. 2019. DOI: 10.1111/cei.13356.

  1. Chu C et al. Green Tea Extracts Epigallocatechin-3-gallate for Different Treatments. Biomed Research International. Volume 2017, 13 Aug. ABSTRACT: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a component extracted from green tea, has been proved to have multiple effects on human pathological and physiological processes, and its mechanisms are discrepant in cancer, vascularity, bone regeneration, and nervous system. This review focuses on effects of EGCG, including anti-cancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticollagenase, and antifibrosis effects, to express the potential of EGCG and necessity of further studies in this field.
  2. Kishimoto Y et al. Pleiotropic preventive effects of dietary polyphenols in cardiovascular diseases. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 67, no. 5, pp. 532–535, 2013. ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to review recent findings highlighting daily dietary polyphenol intake and the diverse function of polyphenols and their possible relationships to cardiovascular disease (CVD). their previous findings provide that Japanese people intake polyphenols mainly from beverages, especially coffee and green tea (in descending order of polyphenol content). Many kinds of polyphenols act as an antioxidant against low-density lipoprotein oxidation, which is known to promote atherosclerosis. Recent accumulating evidence suggests that dietary polyphenols could exert their cardioprotective actions through their potential to improve metabolic disorder and vascular inflammation. These findings raise the possibility that polyphenols have a wide variety of roles in the intestine, liver and vascular tissue.
  3. Qian Yi Eng et al. Molecular understanding of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Volume 210, 10 January, 2018, pp. 296-310. ABSTRACT: EGCG was found to exhibit a wide range of therapeutic properties including anti-atherosclerosis, anti-cardiac hypertrophy, anti-myocardial infarction, anti-diabetes, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. These therapeutic effects are mainly associated with the inhibition of LDL cholesterol (anti-atherosclerosis), inhibition of NF-κB (anti-cardiac hypertrophy), inhibition of MPO activity (anti-myocardial infarction), reduction in plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin level (anti-diabetes), reduction of inflammatory markers (anti-inflammatory) and the inhibition of ROS generation (antioxidant).
  4. Xu Y et al. Inhibition of Tobacco-specific Nitrosamine-induced Lung Tumorigenesis in A/J Mice by Green Tea and Its Major Polyphenol as Antioxidants. Cancer Research, Published July 1992. ABSTRACT: This study examined the effects of green tea and its major components, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and caffeine, on the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice. They also studied the effects of green tea and EGCG on O6-methylguanine and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dGuo) formation in lung tissues caused by NNK treatment. Mice were given 2% tea, 560 ppm EGCG, or 1120 ppm caffeine in drinking water for 13 weeks. The inhibition of 8-OH-dGuo formation in lung DNA by green tea and EGCG is consistent with their ability to inhibit lung tumorigenesis by NNK.
  5. Jung YD et al. EGCG, a major component of green tea, inhibits tumour growth by inhibiting VEGF induction in human colon carcinoma cells. British Journal of Cancer, vol. 84, no. 6, pp. 844–850, 2001. ABSTRACT: Catechins are key components of teas that have anti-proliferative properties. This study investigated the effects of green tea catechins on intracellular signaling and VEGF induction in vitro in serum-deprived HT29 human colon cancer cells and in vivo on the growth of HT29 cells in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin in green tea extract, inhibited Erk-1 and Erk-2 activation in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with EGCG inhibited tumour growth (58%), microvessel density (30%), and tumor cell proliferation (27%) and increased tumor cell apoptosis (1.9-fold) and endothelial cell apoptosis (3-fold) relative to the control condition (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). EGCG may exert at least part of its anticancer effect by inhibiting angiogenesis through blocking the induction of VEGF.
  6. Guang-Jian Du et al. Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) Is the Most Effective Cancer Chemopreventive Polyphenol in Green Tea. Nutrients 2012, 4(11), 1679-1691. ABSTRACT: Previous studies have shown that some polyphenol compounds from green tea possess anticancer activities. In this study, they determined the cancer chemopreventive potentials of 10 representative polyphenols. Among the 10 polyphenols, EGCG showed the most potent antiproliferative effects, and significantly induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase and cell apoptosis.
  7. Mandel S et al. Multifunctional Activities of Green Tea Catechins in Neuroprotection. Neurosignals. 2005;14(1-2):46-60. DOI: 10.1159/000085385. ABSTRACT: Many lines of evidence suggest that oxidative stress resulting in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and inflammation play a pivotal role in the age-associated cognitive decline and neuronal loss in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's diseases. One cardinal chemical pathology observed in these disorders is the accumulation of iron at sites where the neurons die. The buildup of an iron gradient in conjunction with ROS (superoxide, hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide) are thought to constitute a major trigger in neuronal toxicity and demise in all these diseases. Thus, promising future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and aging depends on availability of effective brain permeable, iron-chelatable/radical scavenger neuroprotective drugs that would prevent the progression of neurodegeneration. Tea flavonoids (catechins) have been reported to possess potent iron-chelating, radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities and to protect neuronal death in a wide array of cellular and animal models of neurological diseases. Recent studies have indicated that in addition to the known antioxidant activity of catechins, other mechanisms such as modulation of signal transduction pathways, cell survival/death genes and mitochondrial function, contribute significantly to the induction of cell viability. This review will focus on the multifunctional properties of green tea and its major component (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and their ability to induce neuroprotection and neurorescue in vitro and in vivo. In particular, their transitional metal (iron and copper) chelating property and inhibition of oxidative stress.
  8. Biasibetti R et al. Green tea (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate reverses oxidative stress and reduces acetylcholinesterase activity in a streptozotocin-induced model of dementia. Behav Brain Res. 2013 Jan 1. DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2012.08.039. ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of streptozotocin (STZ) provides a relevant animal model of chronic brain dysfunction that is characterized by long-term and progressive deficits in learning, memory, and cognitive behavior, along with a permanent and ongoing cerebral energy deficit. Numerous studies on green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) demonstrate its beneficial effects on cognition and memory. As such, this study evaluated, for the first time, the effects of sub-chronic EGCG treatment in rats that were submitted to ICV infusion of STZ (3mg/kg). Male Wistar rats were divided into sham, STZ, sham+EGCG and STZ+EGCG groups. EGCG was administered at a dose of 10mg/kg/day for 4 weeks per gavage. Learning and memory was evaluated using Morris' Water Maze. Oxidative stress markers and involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) system, acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and glucose uptake were evaluated as well as glial parameters including S100B content and secretion and GFAP content. Our results show that EGCG was not able to modify glucose uptake and glutathione content, although cognitive deficit, S100B content and secretion, AChE activity, glutathione peroxidase activity, NO metabolites, and reactive oxygen species content were completely reversed by EGCG administration, confirming the neuroprotective potential of this compound. These findings contribute to the understanding of diseases accompanied by cognitive deficits and the STZ-model of dementia.
  9. Rasoolijazi H et al. The Beneficial Effect of (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate in an Experimental Model of Alzheimer’s Disease in Rat: a Behavioral Analysis. Iranian Biomedical Journal. October 2007. ABSTRACT: rogressive cognitive decline is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) which can be modeled by β-amyloid injection into specific regions of brain. Since epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a potent antioxidant agent which its role against oxidative stress and inflammation has been shown in prior studies, we tried to determine whether EGCG administration protects against β-amyloid-induced memory and coordination impairment in rats. Methods: Animals (male Wistar rats) were divided into four groups: sham operated, EGCG-pretreated sham operated (sham + EGCG), untreated lesion (lesion), and EGCG-pretreated lesion (lesion + EGCG). Animals in lesion, lesion + EGCG, and sham + EGCG groups received sterile saline or saline plus EGCG (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally one day pre-surgery and every other day for three weeks. The lesion was induced one day after EGCG pretreatment by injection of 4 μl of sterile saline or water containing 2 nmol/μl β-amyloid (1-40) into the hippocampal fissure. For behavioral analysis, psychomotor coordination (PMC) index and spontaneous alternation behavior were assessed using Rota-rod Treadmill and Y-maze, respectively at the third week post-lesion. Results: We found that β-amyloid (1-40) injection into hippocampus can decrease these behavioral indexes in lesion group in comparison with sham group which is similar to behavioral changes in AD. On the other hand, pretreatment with EGCG can improve the PMC index and spatial Y-maze alternation in the lesion + EGCG group in comparison with lesion group. Conclusion: We concluded that EGCG can be effective in restoring β-amyloid-induced behavioral derangements in rats regarding coordination and memory abilities.

  1. Gota VS et al. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a solid lipid curcumin particle formulation in osteosarcoma patients and healthy volunteers. J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Feb 24;58(4):2095-9. doi: 10.1021/jf9024807. ABSTRACT: Curcumin is the lipid-soluble antioxidant compound obtained from the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn, also known as turmeric. Curcumin targets multiple chemotherapeutic and inflammatory pathways and has demonstrated safety and tolerability in humans, supporting its potential as a therapeutic agent; however, the clinical literature lacks conclusive evidence supporting its use as a therapeutic agent due to its low bioavailability in humans. The purpose of this study was to quantify plasma levels of free curcumin after dosing of a solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulation versus unformulated curcumin in healthy volunteers and to determine its tolerability and dose-plasma concentration relationship in late-stage osteosarcoma patients. Doses of 2, 3, and 4 g of SLCP were evaluated in 11 patients with osteosarcoma. Plasma curcumin levels were measured using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. The limit of detection of the assay was 1 ng/mL of curcumin. In healthy subjects, the mean peak concentration of curcumin achieved from dosing 650 mg of SLCP was 22.43 ng/mL, whereas plasma curcumin from dosing an equal quantity of unformulated 95% curcuminoids extract was not detected. In both healthy individuals and osteosarcoma patients, high interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and nonlinear dose dependency was observed, suggesting potentially complex absorption kinetics. Overall, good tolerability was noted in both healthy and osteosarcoma groups.
  2. Cox KHM et al. Further evidence of benefits to mood and working memory from lipidated curcumin in healthy older people: A 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, partial replication study. Nutrients. 2020 Jun 04. 12(6): 1678. doi: 10.3390/nu12061678. ABSTRACT: A partial replication study by researchers at Swinburne University reveals [lipidated curcumin] improves aspects of mood, memory, and working memory in a healthy older cohort. The pattern of results is consistent with improvements in hippocampal function and may hold promise for alleviating cognitive decline in some populations. This study examined a similar population with slightly elevated cognitive abilities, while eliciting similar results to the first clinical published in 2014 - see Cox KH et al, 2014.
  3. Esfahani K et al. A phase I open prospective cohort trial of curcumin plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors for EGFR-mutant advanced non-small cell lung. J Clin Oncol. 2019. 37(15_suppl): e20611-e20611. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2019.37.15_suppl.e20611. ABSTRACT: This study further provides evidence that short-term use of Longvda® curcumin in patients is feasible and safe. Researchers report high treatment adherence and improved quality of life with curcumin. These findings, as well as efficacy data and the effect of curcumin on other inflammation-associated biomarkers, warrant investigation in a larger phase 2 study.
  4. Scholey A et al. Curcumin improves hippocampal function in healthy older adults: A three month randomized controlled trial. Poster Presentation in: 13th European Nutrition Conference - Malnutrition in an Obese World: European Perspectives (FENS). Dublin, Ireland. 2019: P3-01-02. ABSTRACT: Additional results confirm that [lipidated curcumin] improves aspects of mood, memory, and working memory in a healthy older cohort. The pattern of results is consistent with improvements in hippocampal function and may hold promise for alleviating cognitive decline in some populations.
  5. Scholey A et al. A highly bioavailable curcumin extract improves neurocognitive function and mood in healthy older people: A 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (OR32-05-19). Current Dev Nut. 2019 Jun. Poster Presentation. Volume 3(Issue Supplement 1): nzz052.OR32–05–19. doi: 10.1093/cdn/nzz052.OR32-05-19. ABSTRACT: Previously, researchers at Swinburne University showed significant improvements in measures of memory, attention, fatigue, stress, and mood (Cox KH et al, 2015). This trial was a follow up to the results previously seen in 1 and 3 hrs and in 4-weeks. The results of this second trial further confirm that a single daily dose of 400mg of [lipidated curcumin] improves aspects of mood and working memory in healthy older adults, with measures at 12-weeks.
  6. Gupte PA et al. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of capsule solid lipid curcumin particles in knee: A pilot clinical study. J Inflamm Res. 2019. 12: 145-152. doi: 10.2147/JIR.S205390. ABSTRACT: A comparative examination of (solid lipid curcumin particles) showed that administration was not only faster-acting and safe, but had equal efficacy to the control.
  7. Koronyo, Y et al. Retinal amyloid pathology and proof-of-concept imaging trial. JCI Insight. 2017. 2(16). doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.93621. ABSTRACT: A proof-of-concept retinal imaging trial showing increased fluorescent intensity in retinal amyloid deposits and the highest brain concentrations of free curcumin obtained with [lipidated curcumin]. This trial confirmed one more time the ability of [lipidated curcumin] to deliver free curcumin to targeted tissues, more specifically the brain and retina, and to support cognitive and complete neuronal health. *Winner of NutraIngredients-USA Nutrition Research Project of the Year 2019 for ground-breaking initiatives as "most innovative and impactful nutrition research project pushing the boundaries of nutritional science." Read more here.
  8. Santos-Parker JR et al. Curcumin supplementation improves vascular endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults by increasing nitric oxide bioavailiability and reducing oxidative stress. Aging. 2017 Jan. 3. Vol 9(No1): 187-208.
  9. McFarlin et al. Reduced inflammatory and muscle damage biomarkers following oral supplementation with bioavailable curcumin. University of North Texas. BBA Clinical. 2016 Feb 18. 5: 72-78. doi: 10.1016/j.bbacli.2016.02.003. ABSTRACT: Collectively, the findings demonstrated that consumption of [lipidated curcumin] (400mg/day) reduced key inflammatory biomarkers during recovery after exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). The observed improvements in biological inflammation may translate to faster recovery and improved functional capacity during subsequent exercise sessions.
  10. Santos-Parker JR et al. Curcumin supplement improves vascular endothelial function in middle-aged and older adults. Geront. 2015 Dec. 55(Suppl 2): 195. doi: 10.1093/geront/gnv554.01. ABSTRACT: [Lipidated curcumin] administered at a dose of 2000mg/day (n=16), or placebo (n=13) for 12 weeks increased brachial artery flow-mediation dilation (FMDba) by 34% and forearm blood flow in response to incremental brachial artery infusions of acetylcholine (FBFach) by 44% in middle-aged and older (MA/O) adults (45-74 yrs). Findings support supplementation with [lipidated curcumin] improves endothelial-dependent dilation (EDD) in MA/O adults mediated, in part, by an increase in nitric oxide bioavailability.
  11. Rafii MS et al. The biomarker initiative DSBI pilot: Proof of concept for deep phenotyping of biomarkers. Front Behav Neurosci. 2015. 9: 1-11. ABSTRACT: Retina, being part of the CNS, has previously been difficult to analyze directly; however, retinal amyloid imaging could now be a tool to demonstrate the presence of plaques in the brain in a non-invasive manner. In line with previous findings, this study supports [lipidated curcumin] quickly labeling retinal beta amyloid and inducing fluorescent plaque in the neural layers of the retina of humans.
  12. Cox KH et al. Investigation of the effects of solid lipid curcumin on cognition and mood in a healthy older population. Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University. J Psychopharmacol. 2015 May. Vol 29(No 5): 642-651. doi: 10.1177/0269881114552744. ABSTRACT: This landmark study is one of the first to show a curcumin supplement improves cognitive function in healthy subjects. The trial recruited 60 subjects aged 60-80, and found daily [lipidated curcumin] (400mg) supplementation led to significant improvements in cognitive function versus the placebo group. Excellent safety was reported, including no dropouts or reports of gastrointestinal upset. Significant improvements were observed in measures for memory, attention, fatigue, stress, and mood in as little as one hour after the first dose.
  13. Hazarey VK et al. Efficacy of curcumin in the treatment for oral health – A randomized clinical trial. Government Dental College and Hospital. Nagpur, Maharashtra, India. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol. 2015. 19: 145-52. doi: 10.4103/0973-029X.164524. ABSTRACT: A randomized, controlled clinical trial in 30 clinically diagnosed patients with OSF concluded that [lipidated curcumin] lozenges could be effective in combination strategies for the management of OSF in comparison to single therapeutic modality. In this study, 15 OSF patients in each group (test & control) were treated with either [lipidated curcumin] lozenges (400 mg lozenges for total daily dose of 2 g) or Tenovate ointment (clobetasol propionate (0.05%)). The treatment was given for 3 months and follow-up was done for 6 months.
  14. Machida N et al. Effects of Solid, Lipid Curcumin Particles on alcohol metabolism - An expiatory and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group crossover study. Jpn Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Apr. 48(5): 867-873. ABSTRACT: This study further provides evidence that [lipidated curcumin] curcumin is safe and efficacious. Previously examined in 2014, and recently published, researchers report reduced side effects typically associated with alcohol consumption and suggest that [lipidated curcumin] may offer liver health support through the acceleration of ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolism.
  15. Frost S et al. Retinal amyloid fluorescence imaging predicts cerebral amyloid burden. Alz Dement. 2014. 10(4): P234-P235. ABSTRACT: Retinal Aβ plaques are similar to plaques in the brain. [lipidated curcumin's] ability to cross the BBB and its affinity for binding to amyloid beta have led to its use as a novel, more cost-effective alternative and imaging tool for screening through the eyes.
  16. DiSilvestro et al. Diverse effects of a low-dose supplement of lipidated curcumin in healthy middle-aged people. The Ohio State University. Nutr. J. 2012 Sep 26. 11(79). doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-11-79. ABSTRACT: This study is believed to be the first curcumin trial in healthy people to show improvement in a number of key biomarkers related to healthy aging. Randomized, placebo-controlled study in 39 subjects showing excellent safety as well as significant improvements in markers supporting cognitive health, cardiovascular health, and anti-aging versus placebo.
  17. Khattry N et al. Curcumin decreases cytokine levels involved in mucositis in autologous transplant setting: A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study. Poster presented at 54th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annul Meeting. Atlanta, GA. 2012 Dec 08. Blood. 120(21): 3039. ABSTRACT: The absorption and efficacy of [lipidated curcumin] in lozenge form in a common oral inflammatory and fibrotic condition was tested compared to the standard of care (clobetasol steroid ointment). Subjects taking [lipidated curcumin] observed improvements in endpoints significantly better than those receiving steroid treatment; and therapeutic plasma levels were detected through buccal absorption.
  18. Shah et al. Acute human pharmacokinetics of a lipid-dissolved turmeric extract. Planta Med. 2012. 48-PH5. ABSTRACT: This study concluded that a dose as low as 200mg of [lipidated curcumin] reaches blood levels of free curcumin required for healthy brain aging. Analyzed blood samples with and without the use of glucuronidase enzyme, finding very little of the glucuronidated form compared to previous studies on curcumin.
  19. Pharmacokinetics of [lipidated curcumin]: Dose-concentration correlation. Unpublished, UCLA 2011-2012. ABSTRACT: Pilot studies demonstrating absorption and metabolism of [lipidated curcumin] using various dosage forms.
  20. Gota et al. Safety and pharmacokinetics of a solid lipid curcumin particle formulation in patients and healthy volunteers. Tata Memorial Cancer Centre. J Ag Food Chem. 2010. 58(4): 2095-2099. ABSTRACT: Human bioavailability study demonstrating significantly greater plasma levels of free (unconjugated) curcumin after a single dose of [lipidated curcumin] in both healthy and disease states with 65x greater Cmax and >100x greater AUC than 95% curcuminoids.
  21. [Lipidated curcumin] binds to amyloid in human CNS after a single dose. Unpublished.
  22. A phase 1 open-label prospective cohort trial of curcumin plus tyrosin kinase inhibitors for EGFR-mutant advanced NSCLC. McGill U & Jewish General Hospital, Canada, Ongoing.

  1. Aranow C. Vitamin D and the Immune System. J Investigative Medicine, 2011 Aug;59(6):881-886. ABSTRACT: Quote: "It is now clear that vitamin D has important roles in addition to its classic effects on calcium and bone homeostasis. As the vitamin D receptor is expressed on immune cells (B cells, T cells and antigen presenting cells) and these immunologic cells are all are capable of synthesizing the active vitamin D metabolite, vitamin D has the capability of acting in an autocrine manner in a local immunologic milieu. Vitamin D can modulate the innate and adaptive immune responses. Deficiency in vitamin D is associated with increased autoimmunity as well as an increased susceptibility to infection. As immune cells in autoimmune diseases are responsive to the ameliorative effects of vitamin D, the beneficial effects of supplementing vitamin D deficient individuals with autoimmune disease may extend beyond the effects on bone and calcium homeostasis."
  2. Autier P, Gandini S. Vitamin D Supplementation and Total Mortality: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Arch Intern Med. Sept. 10, 2007;167(16):1730-1737. ABSTRACT: This study identified 18 independent randomized controlled trials, including 57 311 participants. A total of 4777 deaths from any cause occurred during a trial size-adjusted mean of 5.7 years. Daily doses of vitamin D supplements varied from 300 to 2000 IU. The trial size-adjusted mean daily vitamin D dose was 528 IU. In 9 trials, there was a 1.4- to 5.2-fold difference in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D between the intervention and control groups. Intake of ordinary doses of vitamin D supplements seems to be associated with decreases in total mortality rates.
  3. Adit A et al. Association Between Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Level and Upper Respiratory Tract Infection in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(4):384-390. ABSTRACT: Study performed a secondary analysis of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a probability survey of the US population conducted between 1988 and 1994. They examined the association between 25(OH)D level and recent URTI in 18 883 participants 12 years and older. The analysis adjusted for demographics and clinical factors (season, body mass index, smoking history, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Serum 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with recent upper respiratory tract infections.
  4. Marineua AR et al. Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. BMJ, 15 February 2017. ABSTRACT: 25 eligible randomized control trials totaling 11321 participants aged 0 to 95 years were identified. Vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of acute respiratory tract infection among all participants.
  5. Urshima M et al. Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010, May;91(5):1255-60. ABSTRACT: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial compared vitamin D(3) supplements (1200 IU/d) with placebo in schoolchildren. The results suggested that vitamin D(3) supplementation during the winter may reduce the incidence of influenza A, especially in specific subgroups of schoolchildren.
  6. Simoliunas E et al. Bioavailability of Different Vitamin D Oral Supplements in Laboratory Animal Model. Medicina, 2019, 55(6), 265. 2597 C. ABSTRACT: The results of this study suggest that the oral vitamin D supplement vehicle has an impact on its bioavailability, thus it is important to take into account how much of the supplied vitamin D will be absorbed. To maximize the full exploit of supplement, the best delivery strategy should be employed. In this study, the microencapsulated form of vitamin D was the most bioavailable.

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A T Nation Biotest Store Customer
GH
08/31/2023
Grove H.
United States United States

Since iWell, I haven’t even had a cold!

As both a discerning consumer and a healthcare professional deeply involved in wellness, I've made Biotest's Vitamin D supplement a cornerstone of my health regimen. Trust is paramount when it comes to supplements, and this company has earned mine without a shadow of a doubt. With Vitamin D increasingly spotlighted in research for its role in bolstering immunity, this product's formulation shines as both top-quality and efficacious. I appreciate the additional enhancements they've included alongside the vitamin D, enhancing its benefits. Consequently, I wholeheartedly recommend this supplement to all my patients. Over the past two years, many have come to rely on it as a crucial component of their wellness strategy. Kudos to Biotest for consistently delivering products that not only meet but exceed quality expectations. Unlike many competitors, Biotest genuinely commits to the integrity and efficacy of their offerings. For that, I am truly grateful.

T Nation Biotest Store I-Well Review
ML
06/16/2023
Matt L.
United States United States

Great Product

I use it 7 days a week. Just makes me feel good and workout better. Thanks.

ML
05/01/2023
Matt L.
United States United States

Keeps me going

Great product which keeps me running and lifting. Would not be where I am today without it.

A T Nation Biotest Store Customer
GH
12/19/2022
Grove H.
United States United States

Staying well and keeping well with iWell

My wife and I started on this product as soon as it came out. We were interested in staying in optimal health in light of the world health issues we have all been dealing with. We were also big Curcumin fans, so when this product combining both and other immune-boosting elements came out, we were stoked. It's been great, and many of my patients are taking it. I highly recommend it! Great product.

DA
12/14/2022
Daniel A. Dicent Santos
United States United States

Health

Improving my health every day, since several years ago!!!.. I am 53 years old.

SD
11/01/2022
Seth D.
United States United States

Seems good

This seems like a good product; however, I have to take it at night because it make you bloated AF. Also I am surprised that there is no Vitamin Ks, beta carotene, or liposomal Vitamin C.

SF
10/25/2022
Sean F.
United States United States

So far so good

I’ve only been taking it for a month along with Flameout, and I’m liking it

FC
10/19/2022
Florencio C.
United States United States

I well

I recover better from workouts

DA
09/24/2022
Daniel A. Dicent Santos
United States United States

Just enjoy it

For those who wants to keep healthy despite of the time.

DA
09/14/2022
Donald A.
United States United States

Customer service

Excellent, more so because I received a part of my order damaged and BioTest responded immediately and remedied the issue satisfactorily.

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*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.